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S Mark Gubb in group show at Crate Gallery
18 November 2011

CRATE

Artists Include: Vito Acconci, Black Argos, David Blamey, José Arnaud-Bello, Sovay Berriman, Don Celender, Loz Chalk, Rob Chavasse, Adam Chodzko, Desmond Church (with Egle Kulbokaite and Sabel Gavaldon), Patrick Coyle, Andrew Cross, David Cross, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, Anthony Gross, S Mark Gubb, David Hall, Rose Kallal, Adam Knight, Frank Koolen, John Latham, Jamie Bracken Lobb, Elizabeth McAlpine, Julie McCalden, Ronan McCrea, Magnets, David Martin, Nelson Melo and Carolina Rito, Suzanne Mooney, Lawrence Norfolk and Neal White, Graham Parker, Kelvin Pawsey, Laurence Payot, Pedro Diniz Reis, Andrea Schlieker, Anthony Shapland, Gregg Stobbs, Barry Sykes, Aron Taylor, Sue Tompkins, Gavin Turk, Mark Aerial Waller, Neal White, Carey Young + more.

Crate studio and Project Space presents the fifth exhibition as part of the current Exhibition as Medium Programme. This will be Crate's most ambitious exhibition to date; a large-scale group show spanning three separate gallery spaces and the outside space between them, in addition to an events programme curated by Limbo. These events will occur throughout the timescale of the exhibition, and will physically and conceptually shift the exhibition continually, each event leaving a short-term legacy on the spatial framework before the next.

The three-minute punk-rock song is one of the most generous forms of artistic expression ever created. Lasting just three minutes, it allows us plenty of time both before and after the event to carry on with the rest of what we have to be getting on with.The punk song is a conceptually tight machine partly formulated by its duration and dedication to punch hard and fast, but therein lays a beautiful contradiction. Within the body of the song are strewn errors, spasms, glorious hic-ups and splutters, reminiscent of our everyday stumblings.

The world is becoming increasingly fast-paced and precarious - we know that, but rather than translating this as having detrimental impact on the human race and foreseeing some kind of neurotic and psychologically broken utopian reality, instead let us embrace this urgency, and the interruptions and blurring that formulate through it. May we find the strategies, lines and modes we are most capable of using in order to continue to be culturally inspired and exist.

Referring to Agamben's commentary on the absurd notion of the holiday, which as a society we have created as a rewarding break from our everyday working life, we now require shorter bursts of 'away-time', often removing ourselves from daily patterns of life psychologically whilst our bodies remain planted.

Many of the artists in this exhibition recognise the poignancy of a wanting for cultural quickness, and the importance of (the word that defines what we do) practice as we continue to re-interpret and re-invent artistic methods to create new associations and commentaries of our qoutidian reality. The works are not one-hit wonders, far from it; like the punk song, they arrest us and reverberate a political stance through us, shuddering us into an altered state forcing recognition and ambition.

S Mark Gubb in group show at Crate Gallery
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